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Peripheral Insulin Resistance Predicts Liver Damage in Diabetic Subjects with NAFLD Peripheral Insulin Resistance Predicts Liver Damage in Diabetic Subjects with NAFLD

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Date added: 12/07/2015
Date modified: 11/07/2016
Filesize: 256 Bytes
Downloads: 1597

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Surrogate indexes of insulin resistance/sensitivity (IR/IS) are widely used in Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) although they have never been validated in this population. We aimed to validate the available indexes in NAFLD subjects and to test their ability to predict liver damage also in comparison with NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS).

METHODS:

Surrogate indexes were validated by tracer technique (D2-glucose and U-13C-glucose) in the basal state and during an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT). The best performing indexes were used in an independent cohort of 145 non-diabetic NAFLD subjects to identify liver damage (fibrosis and NASH).

RESULTS:

In the validation NAFLD cohort, HOMA-IR, IGR and ISI Stumvoll had the best association with hepatic IR, while peripheral IS was most significantly related to OGIS, ISI Stumvoll and eMCRnodem . In the independent cohort, only OGTT derived indexes were associated with liver damage and OGIS was the best predictor of significant (≥F2) fibrosis (OR=0.76, 95% CI= 0.61-0.96, P=0.0233) and of NASH (OR=0.75, 95% CI=0.63-0.90, P=0.0021). Both OGIS and NFS identified advanced (F3/F4) fibrosis, but OGIS predicted it better than NFS (OR=0.57, 95% CI=0.45-0.72, P<0.001) and was also able to discriminate F2 from F3/F4 (P<0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

OGIS is associated with peripheral IS in NAFLD and is inversely associated with an increased risk of significant/advanced liver damage in non-diabetic subjects with NAFLD.

Fatty Acid and Glucose Sensors in Hepatic Lipid Metabolism: Implications in NAFLD Fatty Acid and Glucose Sensors in Hepatic Lipid Metabolism: Implications in NAFLD

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Date added: 10/11/2015
Date modified: 11/07/2016
Filesize: 2.47 MB
Downloads: 1234

The term non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a pathologic spectrum from lipid accumulation alone (simple steatosis) to steatosis with associated inflammation and fibrosis (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH]). Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis can progress to cirrhosis and potentially to hepatocellular carcinoma. Although a genetic predisposition has been highlighted, NAFLD is strongly associated with an unhealthy lifestyle and hypercaloric diet in the context of obesity and metabolic disease. The dysregulation of specific pathways (insulin signalling, mitochondrial function, fatty acid, and lipoprotein metabolism) have been linked to steatosis, but elucidating the molecular events determining evolution of the disease still requires further research before it can be translated into specific personalized interventional strategies. In this review, the authors focus on the early events of the pathophysiology of NASH, dissecting the metabolic and nutritional pathways involving fatty acids and glucose sensors that can modulate lipid accumulation in the liver, but also condition the progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.